An Historical Analysis of Tax and Fiscal Propositions in California, 1978-2004

Report, 136 pp.
May 2006
What factors led to the landmark approval of Proposition 13 in 1978?  How much money did the tobacco industry spend against the 1998 effort to raise cigarette taxes?  Do voters favor bonds for certain purposes over others?  And finally, what clues can be drawn from voter trends to help inform strategic fiscal initiatives and campaigns in the future?  This publication serves as a unique and comprehensive resource for readers interested in what factors led to the success or failure of any tax and fiscal ballot measure since 1978 and how decisions made at the ballot box contributed to the state’s current fiscal crisis.
[Link to executive summary]
Link to full report
Read about the ongoing Tax and Fiscal Policy Project

Building a Healthy Coyote Valley: A Proposal for Community Health Clinics

Policy brief, 19 pp.
September 2004
Building a Healthy Coyote Valley examines the demand for health care services in Coyote Valley, a region in South San Jose that when developed will eventually house approximately 70,000 residents. The report finds that the existing medical services in south Santa Clara County will be insufficient to address expected demand and two health care clinics will be needed to adequately serve the Coyote Valley community.
[Link to executive summary]
Link to full report
Find out more about Coyote Valley

Analysis of Potential Public Costs of School Bus Driver Outsourcing in Folsom/Cordova

Analytical brief, 3 pp.
June 2004
This brief analyzes the financial costs to taxpayers of a proposed plan to privatize public school bus drivers, with accompanying lower wages and removal of health benefits. It calculated the estimated costs of government transfers needed to support low wage workers, such as Medi-Cal, food stamps, and free school lunch.
Link to full report

Shared Prosperity and Inclusion: The Future of Economic Development Strategies in Silicon Valley

Report, 135 pp.
August 2003
The purpose of this report is to reevaluate San Jose's economic development programs from the perspective of two basic values. The first of these is the belief that economic programs should be inclusive and open. Secondly, economic development strategies should pursue the goal of shared prosperity.
In order to examine the city's approach to economic development from the point of view of these values, Shared Prosperity and Inclusion is divided into three sections: the problem, the challenge, and the solution. The problem discusses why current market dynamics are failing to meet numerous economic needs and why existing social and political models are proving increasingly outdated and ineffective. The challenge investigates the potential of economic development strategies to remedy these problems. The solution section offers a new policy framework that can enable economic development to do a better job for working families, for businesses, and for taxpayers.
[Link to executive summary]
Link to full report
Read about our current accountable development work

A Community Plan for Accountable Development

Policy brief, 50 pp.
December 2002
This publication critiques the lack of accountability standards for the hundreds of million of dollars in developer subsidies distributed by the San Jose Redevelopment Agency.  It introduces the concept of a Community Benefits Policy, designed to restore accountability and give neighborhood residents oversight of how taxpayer dollars are spent and what kind of development is planned for their community.  It also includes a Regional Baseline Study detailing the existing conditions in the county, the city, and downtown across multiple indicator areas: demographics, employment, economic development, housing, neighborhood services, fiscal, family services, and health care.
Read about our current accountable development work

Everyone’s Valley: Inclusion and Affordable Housing in Silicon Valley

Report, 50 pp.
June 2001
Everyone's Valley is the product of discussions between hundreds of community members concerned about housing and inclusiveness. The report details the extent of the housing crisis in the region and proposes a bold new plan to create 8,600 new units of affordable housing in San Jose and Santa Clara.
[Link to executive summary]
Link to full report

A Living Wage for Santa Cruz and Watsonville

Report, 31 pp.
March 2000
At the request of the Santa Cruz Living Wage Coalition, Working Partnerships examined the fiscal consequences to local government and businesses of a proposed Living Wage Ordinance drafted by the community coalition. This report examined the projected effects of an ordinance covering the hundreds of temporary workers employed by the cities of Santa Cruz and Watsonville, as well as employees of business receiving contracts, redevelopment funding, or economic development assistance from the city.
Link to full report

Living Wage: An Opportunity for San Jose

August 1998
A report on the benefits and impact of a Living Wage ordinance on the City of San Jose. This study stimulated the development of the groundbreaking Living Wage Ordinance approved by the San Jose City Council in November of 1998.
Link to full report
Resources:

Affordable housing in Coyote Valley

May 2006
Link to PowerPoint presentation

Addressing the demand for health care services in Coyote Valley

September 2005
Link to PowerPoint presentation


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