Driverless?

September 2018

Driverless?

Autonomous Trucks and the Future of the American Trucker

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Check out the interactive infographic

A joint report with the UC Berkeley Labor Center, written by University of Pennsylvania sociologist & trucking expert Steve Viscelli.

Driverless trucks are on course to replace many of the best long-distance trucking jobs, while shifting the industry towards more low-wage gig jobs.

But if we take proactive steps, automation could deliver efficient freight, family-supporting jobs, and healthy communities.

The $740-billion-a-year U.S. trucking industry is widely expected to be an early adopter of self-driving technology, with numerous tech companies and major truck makers racing to build autonomous trucks. This trend has led to dozens of reports and news articles suggesting that automation could effectively eliminate the truck-driving profession.

By forecasting and assessing multiple scenarios for how self-driving trucks could actually be adopted, this report projects that the real story will be more nuanced but no less concerning.

Autonomous trucks could replace as many as 294,000 long-distance drivers, including some of the best jobs in the industry. Many other freight-moving jobs will be created in their place, perhaps even more than will be lost, but these new jobs will be local driving and last-mile delivery jobs that—absent proactive public policy—will likely be misclassified independent contractors and have lower wages and poor working conditions.

Throughout this transformation, public policy will play a fundamental role in determining whether we have a safe, efficient trucking sector with good jobs or whether automation will exacerbate the problems that already pervade some segments of the industry.

Check out the interactive infographic

Read the full report

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